In the 16th century Kings Stanley

was already an important cloth-making centre: Stanley Mill, the site of a mill since Domesday book was bought by Richard Clutterbuck in 1579. He began the building of nearby Stanley House which was completed in the early 1590s. House and Mill were passed down to Richard's descendants and their relations until the end of the 18th century and were then, after various ownerships, bought by Nathaniel Marling 1841 and sold onto his brother Samuel in 1854.  Samuel Marling and his son William were important employers and benefactors in later Victorian times.

The initials EC beneath the sundial on the exterior of the south aisle may refer to Richard Clutterbuck's widow Elizabeth, while the

initials TC on the parish chest may be those of his son Thomas (d.1614) or his great-grandson Thomas, churchwarden in 1682. A number of owners of Stanley House and Mill have served as churchwardens, notably Jasper Clutterbuck in the later 1750s and William Marling in the 1860s and 1870s.

Memorial to Richard Clutterbuck and family

Memorial to Richard Clutterbuck and family
Memorial Detail to John Halbrow and family

A detail: Memorial to John Halbrow and family

Memorial to Jasper Clutterbuck and family

Memorial to

Jasper Clutterbuck